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Free Compost Event
Free Compost Event
NEW LOCATION!
The Shoppes at Chino Hills Overflow Parking Lot, Shoppes Drive west of Boys Republic Drive
           
Saturday, October 6, 2018
7:30 am until supplies run out!
           
Please bring your own shovel and containers. (No Republic Services containers allowed). 
Send Your Grass to its Roots
There is a growing reason not to throw away your lawn clippings. They already take up too much room in our landfills. So place your grass and leaves in your yard waste container so that they will be sent back to the earth.

Residents of Chino Hills are leaving less behind by recycling their yard waste each week rather than mixing it in with their trash. The average American generates four to six pounds of trash daily and of that, one third is yard waste.

Free Compost
In appreciation of the community’s ongoing efforts to recycle its yard waste, Republic Services and the City of Chino Hills host several free compost events each year. This event is a big “thank you” to Chino Hills residents for diverting so much green waste from the landfill!  Three products are available: wood chips, mulch, and compost. Wood chips and mulch can be placed around trees and planting beds to retain moisture. Compost adds nutrients when mixed with soil. To take advantage of the free compost, just show up with your own container on Saturday, October 6, 2018 at a new location this year!  Come to the overflow parking lot at the Shoppes at Chino Hills, located off of Shoppes Drive, west of Boys Republic Drive.  Due to the popularity of this program, each participant is limited to 60 gallons of mulch.  No Republic Services containers allowed.  Residents must provide their own containers; no bags please.  Bring your own shovel.    

Separating Yard Waste
Using the appropriate collection container makes it possible for it to be processed as alternate daily cover or compost. It is also a vital part of stabilizing disposal collection cost and helping the City comply with state requirements to divert 50 percent of its waste stream.